Posts Tagged ‘Reno’

My story in Reno and receiving the Technologist of the Year award

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

A few nights ago I was honored to receive an award from NCET as Technologist of the Year. This journey started nearly 15 years ago, so I thought I would share more about it.

In 2002 I finished the build out of a colocation data center in Reno, Nevada. I never thought I would come to Reno yet an opportunity to lead a colocation data center company focused on middle sized but underserved cities was appealing for many reasons. Early with this data center in Reno I experimented with and used air economization and hot-cold aisle containment, each very unknown ways to improve data center energy efficiency, perhaps the first use of these techniques, and they did significantly reduce energy use.

Starting in 2004 and for over a decade I worked mostly remotely from Reno for Google (when we started buying, designing, building and operating internal data centers), and Equinix (the largest data center provider), DuPont Fabros (at the time second largest wholesale data center provider), Yahoo!, in which I managed global data center strategy and development at a time when we were building out large internal data centers and expansions around the globe. I also worked for BEA Systems before acquired by Oracle running their global data centers, and completed long-term marketing and product development consulting for Digital Realty, the largest wholesale data center provider, and many others, including Facebook and other Big 7 Internet companies. I call Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Yahoo! and eBay the Big 7, as they build, own and operate the majority of data centers, outspending data center capital every year of all of the colocation providers by a factor of almost 10. I have been lucky enough to work with five of these seven big data center companies.

In the midst of this, myself and others worked together to create and build the Reno Technology Park (RTP), the largest dedicated data center campus known at the time, located just outside of Reno in Washoe County. I worked with many companies to influence them to locate a future data center in Reno, and secured Apple as the first tenant of the RTP.

While maintaining a residence in the Reno area, with its very close proximity to Lake Tahoe, fabulous skiing, mountain biking, cycling and other activities that I love to do and have spent much time in the area for years playing. Yet with a home in the area, I avoid the congestion and high cost of living of the SF Bay Area and also a state income tax. There are many workers in technology companies that live and work in the Reno area and many like me that live in the Reno-Tahoe area yet commute to the Bay Area or elsewhere for work as needed, including executives of technology companies.

Because of the many great companies and people working in the Reno area I am even more humbled to receive this award. Thank you NCET and the board for this recognition and Abbi Whitaker for her nomination. Having developed data centers in over 20 countries and data center site selections in almost 30 countries as well as throughout the United States, I saw that Reno Nevada was a good place to locate data centers, and that they would be great for the local economy. I wanted to bring my industry to my home, and see the local economy continuing to grow and evolve.

I commend the team at EDAWN, Governor Sandoval and his staff including Steve Hill for helping to make these wins. I look forward to continuing to work with our community, all of you, NCET and EDAWN to see Reno’s economy grow and develop.

Considering all of the vulnerabilities of data center sites

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Where to hide your data center and protect it from damaging natural disasters?

I have built two data centers in the Raleigh, North Carolina. I traveled to Raleigh about once per month over a couple of years for these projects, many times driving in ice storms. It’s really quite fun to drive around when everything is coated in a sheet of ice. It’s like driving a Zamboni without an ice rink. Quite frankly, only people like me who have too much confidence in their driving abilities drive—everyone else stays home and for good reason as many cars are stuck on the roads and crashed up while driving in these conditions. Recently, storms in the Raleigh area caused a wide path of “death and damage” as reported here in the NY Times–declaring emergencies throughout North Caroline, Mississippi and Alabama. More extreme weather is predicted for the eastern seaboard with the ever-increasing climate change. Hurricane frequency and strength has increased several times over the last few years. Remember when one good hurricane a year was normal? Now it’s dozens, so much so, that the naming convention has changed completely from alphabetical names to female names to including male names and now numbered names similar to star systems.

Remember when California was the only place we expected to receive large earthquakes? Well, except for Japan, which reminded us once again of the devastation that can occur being along the Pacific Rim. I was in middle Baja following the recent Japan earthquake and had to change plans due to a tsunami warning from the Japan earthquake nearly 10,000 miles away, proving the point that near the ocean following an earthquake can be risky.

The largest earthquake in 35 years hits Arkansas…what you ask?! Arkansas? Yes, the largest in that state yet amongst more than 800 earthquakes in Arkansas since September 2010. Wow!! You can read more about it in this AP/Yahoo news article.

But even more spectacular–as I bring up earthquakes in Arkansas as merely an example–is that the largest risk of large-scale damage from an earthquake in the US is located right under the middle of the US, the New Madris Fault. Directly under Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Tenessee, Missippii, Arkansas, this baby is HUGE! With an ability to create horizontal acceleration of 1.89g, almost 5 times greater than the amount of ground acceleration at The Reno Technology Park near Reno, NV, which is located on stable ground absent of any earthquake faults. See this thesis on the affects of earthquakes on bridge design, which is the pinnacle of civil engineering for earthquakes, as they look at 75-year affects, not 20 as it is for most building construction. Even Texas is not immune to earthquakes. Having damaging earthquakes in 1882, 1891, 1917, 1925, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1948, 1951, 1957, 1964, 1966, 1969, and 1974. Many of these being felt as much as two states away from Texas, which covers a very large area. I type out all of these just to prove the point that even areas thought to be immune from damaging earthquakes have them, and more frequently than we care to remember. You can read more in this USGS article about Texas earthquakes here.

And thus the punch line is to consider data center site selection very carefully. Just because an earthquake has not happened for a long time does not mean that an area is not immune to a damaging earthquake. Check out this map of large earthquake potential and look at the two large circles of converging lines in the middle of the US and under South Carolina—these are the areas of greatest earthquake threat to public and buildings in the US:

How about volcanoes? Sure why worry unless you’re in the South Pacific, Hawaii or Costa Rica, right? Wrong. Over half of the world’s active volcanoes are in … did you guess…. The good ‘ole US of A. That’s right. Most of those are in Alaska as the Aleutian island chain is a pretty exciting place to be. And most of the them in the Continental US are located in Washington and Oregon. But guess what, the most exciting place in the US for a very damaging earthquake of proportions 1,000’s of times greater than the atomic bombs exploded on Japan to end Wrold War II? Wyoming. Yellowstone has been famous for Old Faithful. Heated by a geological hot spot, the same type that has created and is still creating the Hawaiian Islands. But new research calls it a supervolcano. Two of the larger eruptions from this supervolcano produced 2,500 times more ash than Mt St. Helens eruption in 1980, and that provided about 10’ of ash through eastern Washington and elsewhere. And this hot spot is getting hotter. Expected to impact Idaho, Wyoming and Montana with a greater frequency of earthquakes and a possible very large explosion that could wipe out a very large area. Read more about it here.

Why are these important to point out? Because we’ve designed and built data centers to withstand the impacts of what we EXPECT in a certain area, yet so many areas have more impacts than we imagined. Which leads me to site selection. Site selection isn’t so easy as to look at what has recently occurred or what we think might occur in an area; it should involve thorough research and understanding of what really are the risks over time and choose a site that best meets our risk tolerance/”comfort” during the life of the data center. And any risks should be reviewed, even those that seem unlikely, as we can see from many of these examples, that unlikely events can turn out to be devastating to any data center. Hence, location research is paramount to good site selection and these issues not overlooked. A good example is the over 20 active volcanoes in the Portland and Seattle area. Be aware of the risks in your decision or it could lead to a really bad day.